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National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is a yearly observance highlighting the importance of protecting children two years and younger from vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend that children stay on track with their well-child appointments and routine vaccinations. On-time vaccination is critical to provide protection against potentially life-threatening diseases.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

COVID-19 has caused many disruptions in families’ lives – and in some cases, it has meant that children have missed or delayed their wellness checkups and vaccination, which are a critical part of ensuring children stay healthy.
Giving babies the recommended vaccinations by age two is the best way to protect them from 14 serious childhood diseases, like whooping cough (pertussis) and measles.
Among children born during 1994-2018, vaccination will prevent an estimated 419 million illnesses, 26.8 million hospitalizations, and 936,000 deaths over their lifetimes.

National Infant Immunizations Week

Immunization saves millions of lives and is one of the greatest and most successful public health initiatives. Regardless, more than 23 million infants worldwide have insufficient access to vaccines, which puts them at serious risk for potentially fatal disease.

The month of May is designated as Hepatitis Awareness Month in the United States, and May 19th is Hepatitis Testing Day. During May, CDC and our public health partners work to shed light on the impact of these hidden epidemics by raising awareness of viral hepatitis while encouraging testing and vaccination. Hepatitis Awareness Month activities help to improve everyone’s understanding of viral hepatitis transmission and risk factors and to decrease social stigma against viral hepatitis.
 
Viral Hepatitis Key Facts

  • There are several different viruses that can cause hepatitis; the most common types of viral hepatitis are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.
  • Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C are leading causes of liver cancer in the United States.
  • Both hepatitis A and hepatitis B are preventable with safe and effective vaccines, and hepatitis C is curable with prescribed treatment.
  • CDC recommends all adults through age 59 and adults age 60 or older with risk factors get vaccinated against hepatitis A and hepatitis B. If you are age 60 or older and do not have risk factors, you may choose to get vaccinated.
  • About 66% of people with hepatitis B are unaware of their infection and about 40% of people living with hepatitis C do not know they are infected.
  • CDC recommends all adults get tested for hepatitis B and hepatitis C at least once in their lifetime and pregnant women get tested during each pregnancy. Getting tested is the only way to know if you have hepatitis B or hepatitis C.

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW): April 24 – 30, 2023

April 2023

Immunization News

May is Hepa​titis Awareness Month

 August is National Immunization Awareness Month, making this a great opportunity to remind your patients to get their appropriate vaccines.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), thousands of American adults get sick each year from diseases that vaccines can prevent. For patients with asthma or COPD, vaccines are an important step in protecting their health from serious diseases like influenza and pneumonia. August is also a great month to discuss the COVID-19 vaccine. Your patients might even ask you for clarification on the vaccines and resources. Use these resources to help you discuss routine vaccinations with your patients and parents during NIAM and throughout the year.

For Healthcare Professionals

All staff in healthcare practices, including non-clinical staff, play important roles during NIAM:


Interactive Resources for Parents and Patients

Parents and patients may be unsure what vaccines they need. These short, quick quizzes can give them a list of vaccines based on their answers.

December 4 – 8 is National Influenza Vaccination Week

August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM)


National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) is a critical opportunity to remind everyone 6 months and older that there’s still time to protect themselves and their loved ones from flu by getting their annual flu vaccine. CDC data shows that flu vaccination coverage was lower last season, especially among certain higher risk groups, such as pregnant people and children. When you get a flu vaccine, you reduce your risk of illness, and flu-related hospitalization if you get sick. This week is meant to remind people that there is still time to benefit from the first and most important action in preventing flu illness and potentially serious flu complications: get a flu vaccine today. Check out CDC’s NIVW toolkit for more shareable resources and content. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/activities.htm#newsletter